Weekly Roundup: EU sinking & Lib Dems flapping – Leave.EU

BREXITBadBoys

We’re just days away from the release of the Bad Boys of Brexit, Leave.EU
co-founder Arron Banks’ explosive book documenting the mischief, mayhem and guerrilla warfare of the EU Referendum Campaign. Keep an eye out for coverage in the Mail over the coming days. There will be some enticing extracts to draw you into the made world that was the victorious EU referendum campaign.

bsd.firetrench.com

Meanwhile in the here and now, it has been another week of bad news for Remainers as more and more evidence piles up confirming the wisdom of our vote to Leave in June. The CBI has reported a boom in British exports, and the ONS has confirmed that growth since Brexit has outpaced the pessimistic predictions of Project Fear’s doom merchants. And the head of the World Trade Organisation changed his tune and confirmed that trade wouldn’t be disrupted by British exit from the
failing EU.

The good news puts the misguidedness of Theresa May’s pronouncements on the negative consequences of Brexit to the UK economy into sharp relief. The Guardian, which broke the ‘story’ of Mrs May’s attendance at a talk hosted by Pro-EU investment Bank Goldman Sachs in the run-up to the referendum, chose to emphasise the apparent ridiculousness of a Remain campaigner arguing for Britain to stay in the EU rather than her apparent lack of acumen.

Meanwhile, Belgium has annoyed the entirety of the European Union and Canada with their attempts to undermine the CETA deal. The deal currently appears to be back on, but the entire incident has highlighted the absurdity of attempting to arrange trade between so many parties with different economic and commercial interests. Why should the assent of the Walloon province of Belgium be required for Britain to trade more freely with our old friends in Canada? And if things are looking bad for the EU and its ability to secure trade deals, according to Leave.EU Ambassador Jim Mellon, they’re about to get a lot worse when the Euro inevitably collapses.

Across the Channel, trouble has continued over the demolition of the notorious Calais Jungle camp and in London Zac Goldsmith resigned his seat in the Commons after the government announced its decision to support the construction of a third runway at Heathrow. Goldsmith wants to run as an independent against the plans, but the obsessive Liberal Democrats want to turn it into a fight over Brexit. They attempted the same strategy last week in Witney and lost. Let’s hope the people of Richmond Park follow suit and let Tim Farron and his cronies know that their repulsive hatred of democracy isn’t the vote winner they think it is.

Leaders of devolved administrations find meetings with May fruitless

Lib Dems target Zach Goldsmith’s seat in Richmond by-election

The Goldman Sachs talk: is Theresa May a Remainer or a mercenary?

Demolition of the Jungle camp exposes flaws in British asylum policy

“The Euro will collapse” says Jim Mellon (youtube)

The trade agreement between Canada and the European Union has exposed the flaws in European trade strategy, with the pact nearly being derailed by the objections of the Walloon province of Belgium; a CBI report showed British manufacturing enjoying a boom driven by foreign exports, confirming previous evidence from PMI data; another survey showed a fall in the number of distressed British firms following our vote to Leave; Nissan opted to build new models in Sunderland after months of us being told that Brexit would hurt the British car industry; and voters were reminded of the direct financial costs of EU membership after the Treasury accidentally published a £700m bill from the failing bloc.
The reason why I wanted us to be out of the EU is because when the boat sinks you want to be on the lifeboat, you don’t want to be on the main ship singing the national anthem, or Ode to Joy in the case of the EU, and being dragged down in the wake.
Find out why Jim Mellon believes anyone who thinks the Euro will survive
is “absolutely deluded”
The Bad Boys of Brexit Book
edited by Isabel Oakeshott

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